Flood Map

Home
Forecast
Weather station live
Graphs
Weathercam
Weather Maps
Satellite & rain radar
Road Traffic
Lightning map
Pressure Charts
Flood Map
Records
Earthquakes
Sayings
Weather Shop
Gallery
Links
Guest book

 
Met office Flood warnings for the Northeast
Red areas = warning

Green = all clear

 DoncasterWx Weather

UK - WEATHER STATION TOPSITES - UK

 

 Recent floods In England have raised concern over climate change. This map is intended to show the areas which would be susceptible to flooding, due to rises in sea level. This can be used to show areas which are low compared with surrounding areas

 If you live near a river or stream check Environment agency flood page and enter your postcode. Or click here for the latest flood warnings

How to use the flood map

 

1. Left click & drag your destination to the centre. 

2. Click + to zoom in.

3. repeat steps 1 & 2 until you reach your destination.  

4. Use the drop down menu on the left, above northern Ireland, to change the sea level.

 

 Sea level

 Sea level rises at between 1mm and 2mm per annum, so don't  panic if your home is in an area, which is under water at 6 meters, it will take 3000 to 5000& years, for sea level to rise by this amount*, although recent flash flooding has affected areas below this level.

Estimated rise in sea level*

Years Meters
1000 1 to 2
2000 2 to 4
3000 3 to 6
4000 4 to8
5000 5 to 10

*Based on current trends, excludes acceleration which may be affected climate change.

Surge Effect

 Surges are caused mainly by the action of wind on the surface of the sea, with barometric pressure a secondary factor. When pressure decreases by one millibar, sea level rises by one centimetre. Thus, a deep depression with a central pressure of about 960 mb causes sea level to rise half a metre above the level it would have been had pressure been about average (1013 mb). When air pressure is high, sea level falls correspondingly.

Around the UK, the effect of a strong wind coupled with very low pressure can be to raise sea level in eastern England of  more than two metres. Fortunately, large positive surges tend to favour mid-tide. They rarely coincide with high water.

online counter